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the fiscal cliff. right after the election wall street dropped 5% when everybody suddenly focused on the fiscal cliff and realized that this was a problem. but since then it's kind of bumped along at this sort of level. i don't think wall street is at all sanguine about the idea that if we went over the fiscal cliff, life would go on as we know it and everything would be fine. >> one of the things that was really interesting to me to bear out that point is ken conrad yesterday who's been so down, i mean, he's leaving the senate. he's done this for seven years. they can't produce deals. and yesterday when i interviewed him, joe, he said i think we're going to make this. i think the boehner offer had significant indicators that something here is going on, and they're going to come together. >> also, kent conrad, a guy -- i've loved him for a long time, deficit hawk. they haven't allowed him to put a budget out for years. he's growing frustrated. i'm sure he's going to be glad to leave. but i was surprised by that as well. you see also, sam stein, republicans are now starting to real
economy and those seeking work. i came out the day after the election to put revenues on the table, to take a step toward the president to try to resolve this. when is he going to take a step towards us? >> can you see some way that you could agree to tax rate increase and protect small businesses at the same time, maybe going with the 37%, or some middle ground? >> there are a lot of things that are possible to put the revenue that the president seeks on the table, but none of it is going to be possible. if the president insists on his position, insists on my way or the highway. that is not the way to get to an agreement that i think is important for the american people and very important for our economy. thanks. >> reporter: for more on the fiscal cliff let's bring in bob sue sack, managing editor of the hill. thanks for joining us. >> thanks for having me on. >> reporter: he says this is a slow walk for our economy to the edge of the fiscal cliff, and if the president doesn't like the republican's plan he has an obligation to send them one that can pass both houses of congress a
's suggestion that these are really big issues and very big decisions that should be made by our elected representatives in the senate and in the house. i'm not sure i like this idea that the president and the house majority leader, a republican, get to meet behind closed doors and get to make enormous fiscal decisions just between the two of them. >> do you think more would get done if they did this in front of the cameras? >> i actually think it should be one extreme or the other. they should either lock them behind closed doors until they get something done, let them hash it out, and then come out and announce the deal that we're not going to go over the fiscal cliff, or put everything on television. because i don't think i thought i would ever say this, but i do agree with grover nordqvist that this could give a hint about what each party is doing and who they are protecting. i think the democrats and the president would come out looking good on this, because from the very beginning they have said that they want to protect the middle class, extending middle class tax cuts. frankly, t
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3